thebluelip-blondie:

str0ma3:

im dead ass done with snoop dogg

wat

Just when you thought it couldn’t get worse than Snoop Lion.

thebluelip-blondie:

str0ma3:

im dead ass done with snoop dogg

wat

Just when you thought it couldn’t get worse than Snoop Lion.

(via blackgirlsrpretty2)

nothinbutsports:

Michael Jordan takes #Flight 

nothinbutsports:

Michael Jordan takes #Flight 

(via beautymeetsbooty)

Happy Bday MJ #kingofpop #music #virgo

Happy Bday MJ #kingofpop #music #virgo

Bill Hicks

(via stand-up-comic-gifs)

Meet #MartinBaker aka the phone guy meme aka the only Black person supporting officer Darren Wilson at a #Ferguson rally

On this day August 28th in the year 1955 (Emmett Louis Till) was murdered in Mississippi at the age of 14 after reportedly flirting with a white woman. Till was from Chicago, Illinois, visiting his relatives in Money, Mississippi, in the Mississippi Delta region, when he spoke to 21-year-old Carolyn Bryant, the married proprietor of a small grocery store there. Several nights later, Bryant’s husband Roy and his half-brother J. W. Milam arrived at Till’s great-uncle’s house where they took Till, transported him to a barn, beat him and gouged out one of his eyes, before shooting him through the head and disposing of his body in the Tallahatchie River, weighting it with a 70-pound (32 kg) cotton gin fan tied around his neck with barbed wire. His body was discovered and retrieved from the river three days later. Till was returned to Chicago and his mother, who had raised him mostly by herself, insisted on a public funeral service with an open casket to show the world the brutality of the killing. Tens of thousands attended his funeral or viewed his casket and images of his mutilated body were published in black magazines and newspapers, rallying popular black support and white sympathy across the U.S. Intense scrutiny was brought to bear on the condition of black civil rights in Mississippi, with newspapers around the country critical of the state. Although initially local newspapers and law enforcement officials decried the violence against Till and called for justice, they soon began responding to national criticism by defending Mississippians, which eventually transformed into support for the killers. The trial attracted a vast amount of press attention. Bryant and Milam were acquitted of Till’s kidnapping and murder, but only months later, in a magazine interview, protected against double jeopardy, they admitted to killing him. Till’s murder is noted as a pivotal event motivating the African-American Civil Rights movement.

On this day August 28th in the year 1955 (Emmett Louis Till) was murdered in Mississippi at the age of 14 after reportedly flirting with a white woman. Till was from Chicago, Illinois, visiting his relatives in Money, Mississippi, in the Mississippi Delta region, when he spoke to 21-year-old Carolyn Bryant, the married proprietor of a small grocery store there. Several nights later, Bryant’s husband Roy and his half-brother J. W. Milam arrived at Till’s great-uncle’s house where they took Till, transported him to a barn, beat him and gouged out one of his eyes, before shooting him through the head and disposing of his body in the Tallahatchie River, weighting it with a 70-pound (32 kg) cotton gin fan tied around his neck with barbed wire. His body was discovered and retrieved from the river three days later. Till was returned to Chicago and his mother, who had raised him mostly by herself, insisted on a public funeral service with an open casket to show the world the brutality of the killing. Tens of thousands attended his funeral or viewed his casket and images of his mutilated body were published in black magazines and newspapers, rallying popular black support and white sympathy across the U.S. Intense scrutiny was brought to bear on the condition of black civil rights in Mississippi, with newspapers around the country critical of the state. Although initially local newspapers and law enforcement officials decried the violence against Till and called for justice, they soon began responding to national criticism by defending Mississippians, which eventually transformed into support for the killers. The trial attracted a vast amount of press attention. Bryant and Milam were acquitted of Till’s kidnapping and murder, but only months later, in a magazine interview, protected against double jeopardy, they admitted to killing him. Till’s murder is noted as a pivotal event motivating the African-American Civil Rights movement.

1. Oprah ain’t flying commercial 2. She don’t really look like her 3. She does pose like she’s on the cover of O magazine tho #lol #smh #fake #oprah

1. Oprah ain’t flying commercial 2. She don’t really look like her 3. She does pose like she’s on the cover of O magazine tho #lol #smh #fake #oprah